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JD Criminal Justice, African American Woman

April 13, 2014

I am a young black woman who is proud of the fact that I am not angry. I also feel strongly that black people are themselves responsible for most of their own problems and that they all need to pull themselves up by their own bootstraps to whatever extent that is possible. Nevertheless, I have studied the ways in which our justice system is not always fair and a lot of times race does matter. I think racism exists in some form all over the world. Still, me and my brothers grew up in Georgia where racism continues to be pronounced, especially in certain areas. My younger brother went to college in a very small town in south Georgia. He was taken to jail for shoplifting when the cameras clearly showed that he did not steal anything. I felt like the only reason he was arrested was because he and his friends were young black guys. This experience helped me to make the decision to endure the rigors of law school; it intensified my passion concerning the fact that young men of my color are targeted by law enforcement in America. I also feel strongly that the “war on drugs” has long been and continues to be unfairly skewed towards the incarceration of African Americans; sometimes, drug sentences handed down are longer than those for murder. I feel that many if not most non-violent drug offenders should be let out of jail so that they can participate in authentic rehabilitation programs.

I am concerned about the fact that there are more young black men of my color being processed by the judicial system than there are registering for college. I ask for admission to your program so that I will be able to practice an honorable profession and to build a special focus on participation in the criminal defense of young people of color. I am a very energetic and hard working woman, driven to excel at what I dream of doing, saving lives, helping young people, as many as I can, to avoid, evade, or escape the justice system. I want to be their advocate at the same time that this advocacy contributes to the propagation of a better understanding of our justice system.

 

I hope that someday in America we may find better ways to deal with deviant behavior than incarceration. I also dream about a day when black people, my people, are not so grossly overrepresented in our penitentiaries.  I realize, however, that such a dream calls us to remake a new civil society with an authentically equal opportunity for all. I feel strongly that my studies towards the BS in Criminal Justice and my subsequent independent study has enabled me to increasingly think more creatively about how to investigate situations. i have had experience working hands on w/ attorneys when i interned at the court house in college. i have a strong passion for law and helping people. Many of my friends and family come to me for advise.

I look forward very much to having a very family-centered life. At the same time that I plan to have my own family, I also want my professional efforts to focus on families, enabling them to be together, defending and protecting children, and working to keep juveniles with justice system issues out of jail and in school. My determination to excel in law school was also very much inspired while an undergraduate student of criminal justice by my experience working directly with attorneys as an intern at the court house. I hope to build a special career focus on young people, including adolescent and child victims and witnesses. I am very much concerned not only by what happens to these children as individuals, but also the very significant impact, especially over the long term, to the overall safety and well-being of our communities.

 

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